Add a Reset All Filters Button to Your Tableau Dashboard

Click on the picture to Interact with this visualization:

Help users navigate your Tableau dashboard with less effort. In this video I will show you how to create a “Reset All Filters” button on a Tableau dashboard. We achieve the desired effect by using a Tableau action that runs on select of a mark.

The data I am using for illustration purposes is primarily sourced from Mockaroo.com and is loosely based upon data from an actual client of mine. All vendor names, dates, amounts and other data are changed substantially from original form. Feel free to contact me if you need an analysis of your Accounts Payable ERP data from PeopleSoft, JD Edwards or any other source!

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

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Create a Hex Map in Tableau the Easy Way

There are may different ways to create a hex map in Tableau. The hex map helps visualize state geographic data at the same size which helps to overcome discrepancies that make smaller states harder to interpret. Also, larger states (e.g. Alaska) can overwhelm a traditional map with their size.

I’ve found that the quickest and easiest way to build a hex map is to leverage a pre-built shape file. Shape files can be found at various open data sources like census.gov or data.gov.

In this video I will use a shape file created by Tableau Zen Master Joshua Milligan who runs the blog vizpainter.com. He has a blog post where you can download the shape file I reference. Hats off to Joshua for creating and sharing this great shape file!

Tableau Quadrant Analysis Part 2: Dynamic Quadrants

There are a couple of tweaks that can be made to the Quadrant Analysis video I showed you earlier. We can enhance upon the first iteration of the analysis by making the visualization interactive. I will create parameter driven quadrants where the reference lines are not static at a 50% intersection.

You can tweak the instructions to suit your actual visualization as necessary, but the concepts will remain the same.

We’re going to create two new parameters and have those parameters dynamically control the placement of our reference lines. Then we’re going to update the calculated field which defines the color of each data point or mark, with the parameters we created. In this manner, the colors of each mark will dynamically update as the references lines are adjusted.

To put this in English, as you change the parameter values, the reference lines will move and the mark colors will update.

Watch the video above and/or follow along with the instructions below.

Remove Existing Reference Lines:

Step 1:

  • Remove all existing reference lines from the original quadrant analysis. Simply right click on a reference line and select “Remove”.
  • Also remove the annotations from the 4 quadrants.

Create Parameters

Step 2:

  • Create a parameter named “Percentile FG Pct” (without quotes). Select the dropdown triangle next to “Find Field” icon and choose “Create Parameter”.

QA2

Make sure your parameter is setup as a “Float” and the Range of values reflects the picture below. The Display Format will be set as “Percentage” with zero decimal places.

QA3.png

Step 3: Duplicate Your Parameter

  • Right click on your new parameter and select “Duplicate”.
  • Right click on “Percentile Wins” and select “Edit”.
  • Name the new parameter “Percentile Wins”.

Step 4: Show the Parameters Controls

  • Right click on each parameter and select “Show Parameter Control”.
  • Right click on each drop down triangle in the upper right corner of the Parameter Control and select “Slider”.

QA4

Step 5: Add Reference Lines

  • Right click on the Percentile of FG% Axis at the bottom of the viz. Select “Add Reference Line”. The Line Value should refer to the X axis parameter (i.e. Percentile FG Pct). For the Line Formatting I choose the third dashed lined option.

QA5

  • Right click on the Percentile of Wins Axis on the left side of the viz. Select “Add Reference Line”. The Line Value should refer to the Y axis parameter (i.e. Percentile of Wins).

At this point you should have two parameter controls that adjust the placement of the respective reference lines on the visualization.

However, you’ll notice that the colors of the marks do not change as the reference lines move in increments.

Step 6: Edit the original calculated field to use parameters instead of hardcoded percentage values

Right click on the calculated field (i.e. “Color Calc” in my case), select “Edit” and change all references of “.5” to the corresponding parameter name.

  • The original calculated field:

IF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) >= .5 AND RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) >= .5 THEN ‘TOP RIGHT’

ELSEIF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) < .5 and RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) >= .5 THEN ‘TOP LEFT’

ELSEIF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) < .5 and RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) < .5 THEN ‘BOTTOM LEFT’

ELSEIF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) >= .5 and RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) < .5 THEN ‘BOTTOM RIGHT’

ELSE ‘OTHER’

END

Is edited to become:

IF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) >= [Percentile FG Pct] AND RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) >= [Percentile Wins] THEN ‘TOP RIGHT’

ELSEIF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) < [Percentile FG Pct] and RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) >= [Percentile Wins] THEN ‘TOP LEFT’

ELSEIF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) < [Percentile FG Pct] and RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) < [Percentile Wins] THEN ‘BOTTOM LEFT’

ELSEIF RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([FG%])) >= [Percentile FG Pct] and RANK_PERCENTILE(SUM([Wins])) < [Percentile Wins] THEN ‘BOTTOM RIGHT’

ELSE ‘OTHER’

END

In the above formula both [Percentile FG Pct] and [Percentile Wins] are parameter values that have replaced the hardcoded values of “.5”.

Final Result:

As you change your parameter values on the parameter control, the corresponding reference line moves and the color of each mark changes automatically to fit its new quadrant.

QA8

Before w/ Static Quadrants

Notice how the marks are colored according to their respective quadrant in the screen print below.

QA7

After w/ Parameter Driven Quadrants

I hope you enjoyed this tip. Now, get out there and do some good things with your data!

Anthony Smoak

Quadrant Analysis in Tableau

Release your inner Gartner and learn how to create a 2×2 matrix in Tableau. In this video I will perform a quadrant analysis in Tableau using NBA data to plot FG% vs Wins. Since the data points will be compact, we’ll use percentiles to expand the data and create a calculated field to color the data points per respective quadrant.

Make sure to check out part 2 of this series where I will show you how to make the quadrant boundaries interactive.

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Advanced Bar Chart Labeling in Tableau

Here is a quick and easy, yet advanced tip for placing your labels just to the inside of your bar chart. This tip will provide you another alignment option in addition to the default ones. Credit to Andy Kriebel for the tip.

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Create A Barbell/DNA Chart in Tableau with NBA Data

 

A Barbell, Dumbbell or DNA chart should be considered when you want to illustrate the difference or degree of change between two data points. In this video I will use NBA data from the 2016-2017 season (courtesy of basketball-reference.com) to illustrate the difference between team wins and losses.

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Data Profiling with Experian Pandora

 

Experian Pandora is a robust data profiling and data quality tool that enables users to quickly obtain useful statistics related to their data. Once you load your data into the interface, you can identify statistical anomalies and outliers in the data within seconds. To gain these types of insights, normally I have to write SQL scripts or use the SSIS Data Profiling Tool against SQL Server data. Experian Pandora is much easier to use against data in .csv files or Excel spreadsheets since you can simply drag and drop those items into the interface.

A lack of data profiling leads to poor data quality which leads to inaccurate information and poor business performance. I believe you will find this tool a worthy add to your data toolbox.

Download the Free Data Profiler: https://www.edq.com/experian-pandora/data-profiling/

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out all my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Anthony B. Smoak