Passing Parameter Values from Excel to SQL Server

If you’re working with data in Excel and need to connect to a SQL Server database, there are a couple of ways to pass parameter values from Excel to SQL Server. In my first video, “Passing Parameter Values from Excel to SQL Server,” I show you how to connect to SQL Server and read values from a cell and pass those values to a native SQL query without using parameters.

Advantage: The first approach has the advantage of being quick and easy to implement. This is because it does not require any additional setup or configuration, such as creating stored procedures in SQL Server. Instead, the values are passed directly to the query, which can be executed immediately.

However, this approach can also be prone to SQL injection attacks, where a hacker inputs malicious SQL code into an input field in order to gain unauthorized access to the database.

Verdict: Speed over Security. Good for Ad-Hoc personal use.

In my second video, “Call a SQL Server Stored Procedure using Excel Parameters,” I demonstrate how to connect to SQL Server from Excel and pass cell values from Excel to SQL Server using a stored procedure. This approach is more secure because the values are passed to a stored procedure rather than a query. It simply requires the setup of a stored procedure in SQL Server, and I show you two ways to accomplish this feat.

Advantage: Stored procedures provide an added layer of security because they can be set to execute with specific permissions, and can be audited for changes and usage. This makes it harder for an attacker to gain unauthorized access to the database or to execute malicious SQL commands.

However, the potential small disadvantage of this approach is that the stored procedures will need to be updated and managed separately from the Excel file.

If you’re new to working with SQL Server and Excel, I recommend watching both videos. The first video will give you a good overview of the basics, while the second video will show you a more secure way to pass parameter values.

I always have fun creating this type of content and sharing with you, my YouTube channel followers.

You can also follow my dapper data adventures on Instagram.

All views and opinions are solely my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer

I appreciate everyone who has supported this blog and my YouTube channel via merch. Please check out the logo shop here.

Thank you!!

Anthony B Smoak

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