Video

Use Parameters in Tableau to Enhance Your Tables

When you receive a requirement to make a boring Excel style table in Tableau, consider spicing up the table by incorporating parameters. One clever use of parameters enables you to incorporate user defined rows and columns into a Tableau table layout. As a user selects a parameter value (representing a column or row), the table is dynamically updated to show the column or row that was selected.

“Parameters are useful when you want to add interactivity and flexibility to a report, or to experiment with what-if scenarios. Suppose you are unsure which fields to include in your view or which layout would work best for your viewers. You can incorporate parameters into your view to let viewers choose how they want to look at the data.

When you work with parameters, consider the following two things that are important in making them useful:

They need to be used in calculations.
The parameter control needs to be displayed so that viewers can interact with it.”

In this video I will show you how to infuse an otherwise boring table with some parameter driven interactivity. Enjoy!

Reference: Tableau Online Help

Advertisements

Benford’s Law Visualization in Tableau

Benford’s law, also called the first-digit law, is an observation about the frequency distribution of leading digits in sets of numerical data. The law states that in many naturally occurring collections of numbers, the leading significant digit is likely to be small [1]. For example, in sets that obey the law, the number 1 appears as the most significant digit about 30% of the time, and the percentages decrease all the way down to a leading digit of 9, which appears 4.6% of the time.

Why Run This Analysis?

When fraudsters are fabricating data, they may not know to create fake data that conforms to Benford’s Law.  Constructing a Benford’s Law visualization in Tableau can help you determine if your numerical data is fake or at least raise doubts about its authenticity.

In short, remember that one isn’t always the loneliest number!

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out all my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benford%27s_law

 

Use Separate Legends in Tableau (Distinct Column Coloring)

Here’s a handy tip for Tableau 10.2 and above. Learn to create an individual color legend for each measure in the view and then assign a different color palette to each column. This was very difficult to do prior to Tableau 10.2 but now you can apply different color palettes to individual columns with ease!

If you need to know how to apply conditional color formatting to dimensional values watch this video: How to Conditionally Format Text Cell Color in Tableau

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out all my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

How to Conditionally Format Text Cell Color in Tableau

 

Even though Excel and Tableau are far from the same tool, sometimes you have to find a way to force Tableau to behave in an Excel-like manner. Conditionally changing the background color of text in Excel is very easy but requires a hack in Tableau 10.3. Use my video to learn how to conditionally format the cell background of a text or dimensional value in Tableau. Trust me, this is a time saver!

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Easily Unpivot Your Data in Excel Using Power Query

Use the unpivot functionality in Power Query (a free Excel add-in) to easily turn your cross-tabbed data into a more normalized structure. The normalized data structure will grant you the flexibility to create additional analyses in a more efficient manner.

See also:

Download: Power Query Excel Add-In

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau please subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Create a Map with Multiple Layers in Tableau

In this video you’ll learn how to create a map with multiple layers in Tableau using Tableau’s included superstore data set.

  1. We’ll start by building a filled map that represents the profit by state.
  2. We’ll layer on top of this map a pie chart that breaks down Sales by Category.
  3. As a bonus tip we’ll touch upon the FIXED Level of Detail (LOD) expression in order to calculate a percentage of sales by state and category for the pie chart.

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau please subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

Create a Gantt Chart in Tableau

 

Learn to create a Gantt Chart in Excel following the steps I laid out in the above video. In case your tool of choice is Excel, check out my other video on how to create a Gantt Chart in Excel. Your inner project manager will thank you!

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel. You will be smarter for it!

 

Perform Fuzzy Lookups / Approximate String Matching in Excel

Most likely you have a love/hate attitude towards spreadsheets. This highly useful tip will make you fall back in love with Excel. Microsoft does a great job at providing a solid add-in that makes fuzzy lookups relatively easy to perform.

Are there more powerful approximate string matching tools out there? Of course. But if you’re using Excel, this tool should be used before applying more complicated methods.

Everyone loves visualizations but sometimes you have to roll up your sleeves and clean up the data.

Enjoy!

See also: Get Out of the Spreadsheet Abyss

Download: Fuzzy Lookup Add-In for Excel

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau please subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

 

How to Build a Waterfall Chart in Tableau

In this video I will show you how to go “Chasing Waterfalls” in Tableau (apologies to TLC). Waterfall charts are ideal for demonstrating the journey between an initial value and an ending value. It is a visualization that breaks down the cumulative effect of positive and negative contributions. You’ve probably seen them used in financial statements or at your quarterly town hall meeting. Enjoy!

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau please subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.

How to Highlight the Top 3 Bar Chart Values in Tableau

In this video I will show you how to highlight the top three highest sales values on a bar chart. I will also teach you how to add a nested dimension and properly sort the values while keeping the top three values highlighted. Enjoy!

If you’re interested in Business Intelligence & Tableau please subscribe and check out my videos either here on this site or on my Youtube channel.