How to Change the Text Delimiter in Excel

No more COMMA DRAMA! In this video I will show you how to change the default comma delimiter in Excel when making .csv (comma separated value) files. Sometimes text fields in your file have comments that you need to preserve in a flat file. This means you have to change the delimiter. Watch the video for a demonstration and keep reading for a quick reference.

I should note that as of the time of this post I am using Windows 10 Home.

Step 1

Search for “Set Regional Format”

Step 2

Select Additional date, time & regional settings

Step 3

Select Region

Step 4

Select Additional Settings

Then in the List Separator box, change the comma to a pipe.

When you save your .csv file in Excel, it will now be pipe delimited instead of comma delimited.

Your flat file will transition from this:

to this

Do Great Things with Your Data

Anthony B. Smoak

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All views and opinions are solely my own and do not necessarily reflect those my employer.

Add Total Values for Stacked Column and Stacked Bar Charts in Excel

This is the only video you need to learn how to add add totals to stacked bar charts and stacked column charts in Excel. Make sure to watch the video because I have you covered both ways.

I’m more of a video explanation person, so make sure to watch the video so the steps are clearer. Then refer to the bulleted steps as reference once you have the initial basic understanding.

The Keys to Adding Totals to the Stacked Column Chart Above:

  • Add a “Grand Total” column to your data
  • Highlight your data not including the “Grand Total” column
  • On the “Insert” menu select a “2-D Stacked Column” chart
  • Select “Switch Row/Column” as necessary so your first data column is listed on the X axis
  • Select the chart and then expand the data range to include the “Grand Total” column
    • Add “Data Labels” to the Grand Total series on the chart
  • Right click on the Grand Total and “Change Series Chart Type”, the viz becomes a “Combo” chart
  • Change the “Grand Total” series chart type to a “Line”, while leaving all others as a “Stacked Column”
  • Format the line’s data label, changing the Label Position to “Above”
  • Select the line, format the data series and change the “Line” option to “No Line” in order to leave only the totals and hide the line.

The Keys to Adding Totals to the Stacked Bar Chart Above:

  • Add both “Grand Total” and “Spacing” columns to your data
    • Highlight your data including the “Spacing” column but not including the “Grand Total” column
      • The “Spacing” column should have a value of 0 at this point
    • On the “Insert” menu select a “2-D Stacked Bar Chart”
    • Select “Switch Row/Column” as necessary so the “Spacing” values are not listed as an option on the Y axis
    • Change the “Spacing” column values to a number (e.g., 1000) big enough to make a new category visible on the stacked bar chart
    • Right click to “Format Data Labels” and change the “Label Options” to “Value from Cells”
      • In the “Select Data Label Range” pop up box, highlight the values from the “Grand Total” column
      • Change the “Label Position” to “Inside Base”
    • On the chart select the Grand Total Series and right click so the “Fill” option appears
      • Change the “Fill” to “No Fill”
    • Change the values in the “Spacing” column to 0
    • Delete the “Grand Total” entry from the Legend

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All views and opinions are solely my own and do NOT necessarily reflect those my employer.

Do Great Things with Your Data

– Anthony B. Smoak

Select Random Sample Values and Rows using Excel

In this video I help you solve the dual problems of selecting a random value from an Excel list and selecting a number of random rows from a range of data in Excel. At times when I am generating a data-set to use in my video tutorials, I want to select a random selection of rows. Typically, because my data values are clumped together and are too similar to the data on preceding and subsequent rows.

SELECTING A RANDOM VALUE FROM A LIST

Enter three Excel formulas to save the day for selecting a random value from a list:

  • ROWS()
    • Returns the number of rows in a reference or array.
  • RANDBETWEEN()
    • Returns a random integer number between the numbers you specify. A new random integer number is returned every time the worksheet is calculated.
  • INDEX()
    • The INDEX function returns a value or the reference to a value from within a table or range.

Randow Row in Excel Blog Screenshot

  1. In the screenshot above notice that the ROWS() function returns the value of 20, which corresponds to the number of names listed in the cell range of A6 to A25.
  2. The RANDBETWEEN() function generated a random number between 1 and the value returned from ROWS() (i.e., 20). In this case, RANDBETWEEN() combined with ROWS() returned a value of 3.
  3. By combining the results from the first 2 functions, the INDEX() function searches our list and returns the value of the 3rd cell in the list  (i.e., Flor McCard) because the RANDBETWEEN() function returned a value of 3.

When we put it all together it looks like the following:

=INDEX($A$6:$A$25,RANDBETWEEN(1,ROWS($A$6:$A$25)))

I choose to use the absolute cell reference notation with dollar signs although in this case it is not necessary since we are not copying our results to other cells.

SELECTING RANDOM ROWS FROM A LIST

We’ll only use 1 Excel formula to save the day for selecting random rows from a range:

  • RAND()
    • RAND() returns an evenly distributed random real number greater than or equal to 0 and less than 1. A new random real number is returned every time the worksheet is calculated.

By placing the RAND() function in a column co-located with your data, you will assign a random number to each row in your data-set or range.

Once that is done, all you have to do is sort your data by the RAND() column and then select however many rows you need. It’s that simple!

If you are like me, you probably need to see it in action to get a better understanding. Check out the video above and if you learned something, please go ahead and like it on my Youtube channel!

Thanks for your support!

All views and opinions are solely my own and do NOT necessarily reflect those my employer.

References:

All Excel function definitions are from https://support.office.com