Use the Power BI Switch Function to Group By Date Ranges

In this latest video, I’ll explain how to use a handy DAX function in Power BI in order to group dates together for reporting. We’ll examine a dashboard that contains fields corresponding to purchase item, purchase date and purchase cost. We’ll then create a calculated column and use the SWITCH function in Power BI to perform our date grouping on the purchase date.

Watch the video to learn how to group dates into the following aging buckets, which can be customized to fit your specific need.

  • 0-15 Days
  • 16-30 Days
  • 31-59 Days
  • 60+ Days

If you are familiar with SQL, then you’ll recognize that the SWITCH function is very similar to the CASE statement; which is SQL’s way of handling IF/THEN logic.

Even though we’re creating a calculated column within Power BI itself, best practice is to push calculated fields to the source when possible. The closer calculated fields are to the underlying source data, the better the performance of the dashboard.

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Calculate Bar Chart Percent of Total in Power BI

The humble bar chart is the heart and soul of any visualization tool and is the most effective way to compare individual categorical values. We as humans are very adept at detecting small differences in length from a common baseline [1].

To quote the Harvard Business Review [2], “The ability to create smart data visualizations was once a nice-to-have skill. But in today’s complex business world, where the amount of data is overwhelming, being able to create and communicate through compelling data visualizations is a must-have skill for managers.”

If you’re going to start learning a new visualization tool, there is no better place to start than with bar chart basics. In this video I will share how to place a “percent of total” measure (i.e. value) on a Power BI bar chart. We’ll also briefly touch upon customizing the chart’s diverging color scheme.

Since Microsoft is basically giving away Power BI Desktop for free, it may become as ubiquitous as Excel. Don’t be left out!

References:

[1] Cotgreave, A., Shaffer, J., Wexler, S. (2017). The Big Book of Dashboards: Visualizing Your Data Using Real-World Business Scenarios. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

[2] https://hbr.org/webinar/2018/02/the-right-stuff-chart-types-and-visualization-best-and-worst-practices