The Need For Speed: Improve SQL Query Performance with Indexing

This article is also published on LinkedIn.

How many times have you executed a SQL query against a million plus row table and then engaged in a protracted waiting game for your results? Unfortunately, a poor database table indexing strategy can counteract the gains of the best hardware and server architectures. The positive impact that strategically applied indexes can provide to query performance should not be ignored just because one isn’t wearing a DBA hat. “You can obtain the greatest improvement in database application performance by looking first at the area of data access, including logical/physical database design, query design, and index design” (Fritchey, 2014). Understanding the basics of index application should not be eschewed and treated as an esoteric art best left to DBAs.

Make use of the Covering Index

It is important that regularly used, resource intensive queries be subjected to “covering indexes”. The aim of a covering index is to “cover” the query by including all of the fields that are referenced in WHERE or SELECT statements. Babbar, Bjeletich, Mackman, Meier and Vasireddy (2004) state, “The index ‘covers’ the query, and can completely service the query without going to the base data. This is in effect a materialized view of the query. The covering index performs well because the data is in one place and in the required order.” The benefit of a properly constructed covering index is clear; the RDBMS can find all the data columns it needs in the index without the need to refer back to the base table which drastically improves performance. Kriegel (2011) asserts, “Not all indices are created equal — If the column for which you’ve created an index is not part of your search criteria, the index will be useless at best and detrimental at worst.”

Apply a Clustered Index

More often than not, a table should have a clustered index applied so as to avoid expensive table scans by the query optimizer. It is advisable to create one clustered index per table preferably on the PRIMARY KEY column. In theory, since the primary key is the unique identifier for a row, query writers will employ the primary key in order to aid with record search performance.

“When no clustered index is present to establish a storage order for the data, the storage engine will simply read through the entire table to find what it needs. A table without a clustered index is called a heap table. A heap is just an unordered stack of data with a row identifier as a pointer to the storage location. This data is not ordered or searchable except by walking through the data, row by row, in a process called a scan” (Fritchey, 2014).

However, the caveat to applying clustered indexes on a transactional table is that the index must be reordered after every INSERT or UPDATE to the key which can add substantial overhead to those processes. Dimensional or static tables which are only accessed for join purposes are optimal for this indexing strategy.

Apply a Non-Clustered Index

Another consideration in regard to SQL performance tuning is to apply non-clustered indexes on foreign keys within frequently accessed tables. Babbar et al. (2004) advise, “Be sure to create an index on any foreign key. Because foreign keys are used in joins, foreign keys almost always benefit from having an index.”

Indexing is an Art not a Science

Always remember that indexing is considered an art and not a science. Diverse real world scenarios often call for different indexing strategies. In some instances, indexing a table may not be required. If a table is small (on a per data page basis), then a full table scan will be more efficient than processing an index and then subsequently accessing the base table to locate the rest of the row data.

Conclusion

One of the biggest detriments to SQL query performance is an insufficient indexing strategy. On one hand, under-indexing can potentially cause queries to run longer than necessary due to the costly nature of table scans against unordered heaps. This scenario must be counterbalanced by the tendency to over-index, which will negatively impact insert and update performance.

When possible, SQL practitioners and DBAs should collaborate to understand query performance as a whole; especially in a production environment. DBAs left to their own devices have the potential to create indexes without any knowledge of the queries that will utilize those indexes. This uncoordinated approach has the potential to render indexes inefficient on arrival. Conversely, it is equally important that SQL practitioners have a basic understanding of indexing as well. Placing “SELECT *” in every SQL query will negate the effectiveness of covering indexes and add additional processing overhead as compared to specifically listing the subset of fields desired.

Even if you do not have administrative access to the tables that constitute your queries, approaching your DBA with a basic understanding of indexing strategies will lead to a more effective conversation.

References

Babbar, A., Bjeletich, S., Mackman, A., Meier, J., & Vasireddy, S. (May, 2004). Improving .NET Application Performance and Scalability. Retrieved from https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff647793.aspx

Fritchey, Grant. ( © 2014). Sql server query performance tuning (4th ed.).

Kriegel, Alex. ( © 2011). Discovering sql: a hands-on guide for beginners.

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