From White Hat to Cyber Terrorist: The Seven Types of Hackers

The traditional definition of a hacker is someone who uses computers to gain unauthorized access to data. “Hacks” are deployed for various reasons as diverse as the thrill of the conquest, protests, profit or bolstering status within the hacker community. Some security professionals question whether the term “ethical hacker” is a contradiction in terms, as hacking was originally defined as a criminal activity (Wikipedia, Certified Ethical Hacker).

Conrad Constantine a research engineer at the security management company AlienVault states, “The term ‘ethical’ is unnecessary – it is not logical to refer to a hacker as an ‘ethical hacker’ because they have moved over from the ‘dark side’ into ‘the light’… The reason companies want to employ a hacker is not because they know the ‘rules’ to hacking, but because of the very fact that they do not play by the rules” (Bodhani, pg. 66)

There are many subgroups within the hacker community that encompass more than the traditional black hat, white hat dichotomy. Here are a few of the different types of hackers and their aims:

  • White Hat: Commonly referred to as an Ethical Hacker. Holders of the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification who uphold the values of the EC-Council (aka the International Council of Electronic Commerce Consultants) would be classified as white hat hackers. The aim of the white hat is to legally and non maliciously perform penetration testing and vulnerability assessments against computer systems in order to improve security weaknesses. White hats are typically employed by security consulting firms that perform penetration testing.
  • Black Hat: Commonly referred to as a “cracker”. Black hats are the opposite of a white hat hacker in that black hats attempt to penetrate computer systems illegally and without prior consent. A Black hat hacker is interested in committing a range of cybercrimes such as identity theft, destroying data, destabilizing systems, credit card fraud etc.
  • Grey Hat: The ethics of the grey hat lies somewhere between those of the white hat and black hat hackers. A grey hat may use the tools and skill sets of a black hat to penetrate into a system illegally but will exhibit white tendencies in that no harm is caused to the system. Typically, the grey hat will notify the system owner of any systems vulnerabilities uncovered.
  • Blue Hat: An outside external security professional invited by Microsoft to exploit vulnerabilities in products prior to launch. This community gathers every year in a conference sponsored by Microsoft; the blue signifies Microsoft’s corporate color. “BlueHat’s goal is to educate Microsoft engineers and executives on current and emerging security threats in an effort to help address security issues in Microsoft products and services and protect customers” (Microsoft, 2013, para. 1)
  • Hacktivists: These hackers will compromise a network or system for political or socially motivated purposes. Website defacement or denial-of-service attacks are the favored methods used by Hacktivists (Wikipedia, Hacker (Computer Security)).
  • Script Kiddies: These “hackers” are amateurs who follow directions and use scripts developed and prepared by advanced hackers. The script kiddie may be able to successfully perform a hack but has no thorough understanding of the actual steps employed.
  • Cyber Terrorists: According to the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, cyberterrorism is any “premeditated, politically motivated attack against information, computer systems, computer programs, and data which results in violence against non-combatant targets by sub-national groups or clandestine agents. Unlike a nuisance virus or computer attack that results in a denial of service, a cyberterrorist attack is designed to cause physical violence or extreme financial harm. According to the U.S. Commission of Critical Infrastructure Protection, possible cyberterrorist targets include the banking industry, military installations, power plants, air traffic control centers, and water systems” (Search Security)

Bodhani, A. (January, 2013). “Ethical hacking: bad in a good way.” Engineering and Technology Magazine, 7(12), Pg.64-64

Cyberterrorism. In Search Security. Retrieved April 16, 2013 from http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/definition/cyberterrorism

Microsoft. (2013). BlueHat Security Briefings. Retrieved April 16, 2013 from http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/security/cc261637.aspx

Image courtesy of pat138241 at freedigitalphotos.net

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